Please leave this field empty
Facebook Twitter YouTube

Scientific Advisory Board

International Expertise

In 2003, the Academic Alliance (AA) created an International Scientific Advisory Board (SAB) chaired by Dr. Paul Volberding to give direction to training, research, and clinical programs in Africa. This panel of world-renowned scientists from the United States, Canada, Europe, and Africa, provide expert guidance and critical international perspectives on Accordia Global Health Foundation’s current and future initiatives.

David Bangsberg, MD

David Bangsberg, MD, MPH is Director of the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Global Health, Director of the International Program of the Harvard University Center for AIDS Research and is a Professor at the Harvard School of Medicine, Harvard School of Public Health, and Mbarara University of Science and Technology. He completed medical school at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, his internal medicine and chief residency at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York, and Fellowships in Infectious Disease and AIDS Prevention at the University of California, San Francisco. He also holds Master's Degrees in Public Health from the University of California, Berkeley and the History and Philosophy of Science from Kings College, London. Dr. Bangsberg’s research focuses on social behavioral factors related to HIV treatment access, treatment adherence and treatment outcomes in impoverished populations. His work was cited by President Bill Clinton as the “nail in the coffin” on the debate as to whether HIV-infected people in sub-Saharan Africa would adhere to antiretroviral medications. Dr. Bangsberg received the AIDS Research Institute Mentoring Award from UCSF, the Clifford Berger Mentoring Award from Harvard Medical School, and the Pioneer Award from NIMH. He has published more than 270 manuscripts and raised over 50 million dollars in funding related to the study of social, behavioral, and structural determinants of HIV treatment in vulnerable populations. He is on the Editorial Boards of PLOS Medicine, JAIDS, AIDS Patient Care and STDs, AIDS Care and AIDS and Behavior as well as the Scientific Advisory Board for the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief.

Back to top

Connie Celum, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Connie Celum received her medical school and internal medicine training at UCSF and epidemiology training and infectious disease fellowship at University of Washington.  She conducts observational epidemiology about HIV and STIs and conducts HIV prevention trials to identify effective strategies to reduce HIV acquisition and transmission. She has conducted trials of behavioral interventions and biomedical interventions in heterosexual and men who have sex with men populations.  She has led several international, multi-center efficacy trials of genital herpes suppression for prevention of HIV acquisition (HPTN 039) in the US, Peru, and Africa and herpes suppression for HIV transmission and disease progression (Partners in Prevention HSV/HIV Transmission Study) among HIV serodiscordant couples in East and southern Africa, and tenofovir-based pre-exposure antiretroviral prophylaxis among HIV serodiscordant couples in Kenya and Uganda (the Partners PrEP Study).  She is the PI of combination HIV prevention studies to evaluate how to achieve high levels of HIV testing and effective linkages to HIV care and evidence-based HIV prevention interventions in South Africa and Uganda.  

Back to top

Molly Cooke, MD

Molly Cooke, M.D. FACP, Professor of Medicine, holds the William G. Irwin Endowed Chair as Director of The Haile T. Debas Academy of Medical Educators at the University of California, San Francisco. 

Dr. Cooke has been active in medical education program development and educational research throughout her career. An awardee of HRSA funding for the “Interdisciplinary Generalist Curriculum”, she served as the founding director of "Foundations of Patient Care,” an innovative six-quarter, preceptorship-based course for first- and second-year medical students.  Dr. Cooke has taught in the Parnassus Integrated Student Clinical ExperienceS (PISCES) since its inception and advises a research group that is studying longitudinal integrated clinical experiences to replace the conventional third year of medical school at three sites nationally.  A distinguished teacher, Dr. Cooke has twice received the Kaiser Family Foundation Teaching Award as well as a UCSF Academic Senate Award for Distinction in Teaching.  In 2006, she was awarded the AOA/Robert J. Glaser Distinguished Teacher Award by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC); in 2010, she received the Career Achievement Award in Education from the Society for General Internal Medicine.

As a Senior Scholar of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, she co-directed a national study of medical education.  This work culminated in the text, Educating Physicians: A Call for Reform of Medical School and Residency, co-authored with Drs. David Irby and Bridget O’Brien, published in June 2010 by Jossey-Bass/Wiley.

Dr. Cooke is a practicing internist with a special interest in HIV and other complex chronic illnesses.  She has advised the AMA, the American College of Physicians (ACP), and the AAMC on clinical care and ethical and policy issues in the HIV epidemic, and was a founding co-director of the AIDS Task Force of the Society for General Internal Medicine. She testified before both National Commissions on AIDS (1988 and 1990).  She was a Department of Health and Human Services Primary Care Health Policy Fellow in 2004 and has been repeatedly selected by her peers as one of “America’s Best Doctors.”  Governor of the Northern California chapter of the American College of Physicians from 2004 to 2009, she currently serves as a Regent and will become President-elect of the College in April 2012. 

Dr. Cooke is a graduate of Stanford University.  She received her medical degree from Stanford University School of Medicine.  She did her residency training at the University of California, San Francisco where she also served as chief resident in medicine and did a Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Fellowship focusing on ethics.

Back to top

David Durack, MD

Dr. David T Durack is Senior Vice President, Corporate Medical Affairs and Director of Pre-Clinical and Clinical Development for Becton Dickinson (BD), and Consulting Professor of Medicine at Duke University. He graduated from University of West Australia Medical School ’69, and undertook postgraduate studies at Oxford University ’70 -’73 as a Rhodes Scholar, leading to Doctor of Philosophy ’73. His doctoral thesis was titled "Experimental Endocarditis". He held internship and residency posts at the Radcliffe Infirmary, Oxford with further training at the Royal Post-graduate Medical School, Hammersmith Hospital, London. His research has centered on host-parasite interactions and chemotherapy of bacterial and fungal infections. For 17 years he was chief of the Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health at Duke University. He is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (UK), the Royal Australasian College of Physicians, and the American College of Physicians; he has published more than 200 articles and textbook chapters and co-edited several textbooks. Dr. Durack has been elected to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Council of the Infectious Diseases Society of America, and the American Academy of Microbiology. He has served on an FDA Review Panel, as Chairman of the Board of Directors, ASM Resources Inc., and as a Director of Joint Commission Resources.

Back to top

Christian Happi, PhD

Dr. Christian Happi is a molecular biologist focused on antimalarial drug resistance and new drug discovery. He is currently serving as Principal Investigator of the Malaria Research Laboratories and as an Adjunct Lecturer in the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics in the College of Medicine at the University of Ibadan.   He jointly serves as a Visiting Scientist at the Department of Immunology and Infectious Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health.

Back to top

Nick Hellmann, MD

Dr. Nicholas Hellmann serves as executive vice president of medical and scientific affairs at the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation. In this position, he provides strategic direction for programs and research initiatives, ensuring that children are at the forefront of medical and scientific breakthroughs. Prior to assuming his current position, Hellmann was the program leader of the HIV/AIDS program at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, where he was responsible for strategy, research, program, and policies related to HIV/AIDS for the Foundation. He has extensive experience in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology sectors, having worked with industry leaders like Roche Molecular Systems, ViroLogic, Gilead Sciences, Genentech, and Bristol-Myers Squibb. Dr. Hellmann received his MD degree from the University of Kentucky in 1982, and completed his internal medicine residency and infectious diseases fellowship training at University of California San Francisco (USFC), where he later became an assistant professor in the internal medicine/infectious diseases division. While on staff at UCSF, Hellmann conducted research in Uganda to identify HIV risk factors and develop effective intervention strategies to reduce heterosexual HIV transmission.

Back to top

Doreen Ramogola-Masire, MD

Dr. Doreen Ramogola-Masire, graduated with honors from the School of Medicine of the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom.  She then continued her training in Obstetrics and Gynecology first in the United Kingdom and then in the Republic of South Africa at the University of Cape Town, where she also pursued subspecialties in Perinatal Medicine and Cervical Cancer Prevention.  Dr. Ramogola-Masire has a joint appointment at the University of Botswana and University of Pennsylvania. Her interest in point of care screening modalities are suited to low-resource settings, and she has extensive experience establishing and managing cervical cancer screening programs in Southern Africa. Since 2007, Dr. Ramogola-Masire has led the Women’s Health Initiative of the Botswana–UPenn Partnership (BUP-a collaboration between Botswana government and universities of Botswana and Pennsylvania), through which she is supporting the government of Botswana to scale up cervical cancer prevention around the country as the lead country expert. Her training in Perinatal Medicine has made her a key participant in issues of HIV infected pregnant women.  Dr. Ramogola-Masire co-directed the first PMTCT clinic in the Western Cape, South Africa. She has been involved in the Botswana national HIV guidelines and serves in the national HIV Specialist Panel. She was appointed the country director of BUP in 2009, supervising more than 100 faculty and staff in Botswana, and interacts extensively with senior personnel at the MOH, University of Botswana, CDC-Botswana, US Embassy and other developmental agencies in country in all matters relating to health. Her outstanding interpersonal skills, training, and great understanding of the local and regional needs, have turned her into a national and international leader in women’s health.

Back to top

Paul Volberding, MD, CHAIR

Dr. Paul Volberding is a professor and vice chair of the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and chief of the Medical Service at the San Francisco Veterans Administration Medical Center. He received his undergraduate and medical degrees at the University of Chicago and the University of Minnesota, respectively, and finished training at the University of Utah and the UCSF, where he studied for two years as a research fellow in the virology laboratory of Dr. Jay Levy, later a co-discoverer of HIV. For twenty years, Dr. Volberding’s professional activities centered at San Francisco General Hospital where he established a model program of AIDS patient care, research, and professional education. His research career began with investigations of HIV-related malignancies, especially Kaposis Sarcoma. His primary research focus, however, shifted to clinical trials of antiretroviral drugs. He has been instrumental in testing many compounds, including early studies in asymptomatic infection that lead to the concept of HIV disease, not simply AIDS as the target of treatment. Dr. Volberding has written many research and review articles. He is the co-editor-in-chief of the Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, and a founder of HIV InSite, a comprehensive source of HIV information. He is the founder and chair of the Board of the International AIDS Society - USA. He also served as President of the HIV Medical Association. He was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences in 1999.

Back to top

Dr. Doreen Ramogola-Masire, graduated with honors from the School of Medicine of the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom.  She then continued her training in Obstetrics and Gynecology first in the United Kingdom and then in the Republic of South Africa at the University of Cape Town, where she also pursued subspecialties in Perinatal Medicine and Cervical Cancer Prevention.  Dr. Ramogola-Masire has a joint appointment at the University of Botswana and University of Pennsylvania. Her interest in point of care screening modalities are suited to low-resource settings, and she has extensive experience establishing and managing cervical cancer screening programs in Southern Africa. Since 2007, Dr. Ramogola-Masire has led the Women’s Health Initiative of the Botswana–UPenn Partnership (BUP-a collaboration between Botswana government and universities of Botswana and Pennsylvania), through which she is supporting the government of Botswana to scale up cervical cancer prevention around the country as the lead country expert. Her training in Perinatal Medicine has made her a key participant in issues of HIV infected pregnant women.  Dr. Ramogola-Masire co-directed the first PMTCT clinic in the Western Cape, South Africa. She has been involved in the Botswana national HIV guidelines and serves in the national HIV Specialist Panel. She was appointed the country director of BUP in 2009, supervising more than 100 faculty and staff in Botswana, and interacts extensively with senior personnel at the MOH, University of Botswana, CDC-Botswana, US Embassy and other developmental agencies in country in all matters relating to health. Her outstanding interpersonal skills, training, and great understanding of the local and regional needs, have turned her into a national and international leader in women’s health.