Subscribe to our mailing list
Spread The Word
Support Our Campaigns
Donate Now
Upcoming Events
Contact Us

2010 News Archieve
Boston Event Raises Over $250,000 for Accordia

Accordia International Council member Nancy Brady mobilizes network in support of Accordia.

December 10, 2010, Washington DC - Nancy Brady, sister of New England Patriot's star quarterback Tom Brady, helped raise over $250,000 at a holiday fundraiser for Accordia Global Health Foundation on Tuesday, December 7, at the critically-acclaimed L'Espalier Restaurant in Boston. Nancy, a member of Accordia's International Council, spent six months at Accordia's flagship program, the Infectious Diseases Institute in Kampala, Uganda, as part of a Pfizer Global Health Fellowship. Contributions from guests and other supporters, auction proceeds, and matching gifts from Accordia board members made up the total raised.

"I am so thrilled we were able to raise over a quarter-million dollars for Accordia and its flagship program, the Infectious Diseases Institute," shared Nancy Brady. "This support will help grow critical research, training, and clinical care programs, empowering more Africans in the fight against HIV/AIDS, TB and malaria, and to thrive!"

Among the 150 guests were Tom Brady; supermodel Gisele Bündchen; Mike O'Malley, star of the Emmy-winning series, Glee; businessman and philanthropist Charles "Chad" Gifford; Boston Celtics star Ray Allen; and Boston Red Sox players Kevin Youkilis and Jason Varitek. Accordia and IDI attendees included board members Zanne Sande Mrlik and Don Holzworth; IDI executive director Dr. Alex Coutinho; IDI clinic director Dr. Andrew Kambugu; and Accordia executive director Carol Spahn.

"Through her personal experience as a Pfizer fellow at Accordia's Infectious Diseases Institute in Uganda, Nancy was inspired by the stories of our trainees - doctors and nurses that become real leaders in their communities. In turn, Nancy has inspired countless others to get involved. She is real testament to what is possible," said Accordia executive director Carol Spahn.

For more information and pictures from the event:

World AIDS Day 2010

On this World AIDS Day, Accordia Global Health Foundation salutes the thousands of health workers, community advocates, and patient volunteers who are dedicated to fighting a pandemic that has resulted in more than 25 million deaths and infected 60 million people worldwide.

The intensive efforts of the past two decades by multilateral organizations, governments, foundations, corporations, and individuals to reduce the suffering caused by infectious diseases like HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria in Africa are beginning to yield results. Better prevention and diagnostic tools have been created, new treatments have been developed and made widely available, and over a million lives have been saved. Twenty-two African countries have now reduced new HIV infection rates by more than 25%.

But there are still major challenges to overcome before the continent's population can look forward to better health outcomes for all. The emergency actions of the world's response to one after another infectious disease crisis must now begin to be replaced by the development of strong, permanent healthcare systems in Africa, led—at all levels—by African healthcare providers, managers, researchers, and academics. It is essential that this leadership be developed to scale up existing programs, sustain efforts that are proving successful and eliminate those that are not, conduct and interpret new research, and develop new interventions where they are necessary.

What is needed is a bold, sustained approach to improving health in Africa that includes an explicit emphasis on the development of leading individuals, institutions, and the networks that connect them, bringing together expertise from around the region and globe to drive fundamental change. This will require a paradigm shift toward a more effective, intentional approach to the development of leaders. It will also require investment of substantial resources both to prepare individuals and institutions for leadership roles in healthcare policy, education, research, and service delivery and to create an enabling environment in which new leaders can thrive.

Over the last decade, Accordia Global Health Foundation and our partners have empowered thousands of Africans to fight HIV and other infectious diseases through the Infectious Diseases Institute in Uganda, a center of excellence in research, training, prevention, and advanced clinical care. These dedicated leaders – nurses, doctors, researchers, patients, activists, lab technicians, data specialists, community health workers and many others – are improving the quality of life across the region as they teach, treat, and inspire others.

Accordia is committed to fighting the HIV/AIDS pandemic alongside these committed individuals, and we hope that you will join us in this quest to create a vibrant, healthy Africa.

Second Annual Merle A. Sande Health Leadership Award Recognizes Emerging African Leaders in Infectious Disease

October 21, 2010, Washington DC - Accordia Global Health Foundation is pleased to announce the second annual Merle A. Sande Health Leadership Award and to invite nominations and applications.

The award was established in memory of Dr. Merle Sande, a co-founder of Accordia and a renowned infectious diseases specialist known for his enthusiasm for work and life, his joy of teaching, and his outstanding leadership abilities. In 2010, Accordia presented the first Merle A. Sande Health Leadership Award to Dr. W.D. Francois Venter, senior director of the HIV Management Cluster in the Reproductive Health and HIV Research Unit (RHRU) at the University of Witwatersrand, for his remarkable knowledge and experience, dedication to his patients, and resounding impact on his country's fight against HIV.

In 2011, Accordia will present the second annual Merle A. Sande Health Leadership Award to an emerging African leader who has contributed to the field of infectious disease and embodies Dr. Sande's passion, intellectual drive, and spirit. The successful candidate will be a young leader with remarkable personal accomplishments in teaching, research, and/or clinical science.

Nominations and applications will be accepted through 31 January 2011, and the award will be announced in April 2011. The awardee will be invited to lead two (2) days of rounds, lectures, and a keynote address at the Infectious Diseases Institute of Makerere University in Kampala, Uganda in May 2011.

More Information

About the Award
Application Form


To be considered, a completed application must be emailed to by 31 January 2011.

If you have any questions related to the Merle A. Sande Health Leadership Award or the application or evaluation process, please email sandeaward@accordiafoundation.org

Accordia Featured on the Michael Eric Dyson Show

September 14, 2010, Washington DC - Dr. Alex Coutinho, executive director of the Infectious Diseases Institute, and Accordia's executive director, Carol Spahn, spoke with Michael Eric Dyson about the challenges of building and operating African medical facilities.

IDI Lab Recognized in International Competition

April 29, 2010, Washington, DC: The Makerere University-Johns Hopkins University (MU-JHU) Core Lab at the Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI) has been named first runner up for the 2010 Medical Laboratory Observer (MLO) Laboratory of the Year.

Each year, MLO selects three laboratories for this award—one winner and two runners up. The Core Lab was also honored in 2008 as the second runner up. At that time, it was the first laboratory outside of the United States to receive such high recognition from the MLO, and it is the only international laboratory honored this year.

As one of only six African laboratories to receive accreditation from the College of American Pathologists, the Core Lab has a reputation for outstanding quality and service. As such, the lab provides services to nearly 60 different research studies, public and private hospitals, smaller clinics, and individuals. It is one of the busiest medical labs in Uganda, processing 16,000 tests each month, and it serves as a model of efficiency and quality.

As Uganda works to end the HIV/AIDS epidemic, IDI has focused vast resources on research and testing to tackle the disease. The Core Lab has been key in this pursuit, serving as a laboratory training site for clinical and laboratory staff, specifically focused on HIV testing, monitoring, and treatment. The lab has also hosted clinical research on the prevention of mother-to-child transmission, as well as research efforts to develop cost-effective and reliable testing methods for HIV.

Reacting to news of this latest honor for the Core Lab, Accordia Global Health Foundation president, Dr. Warner C. Greene, said, "This is an outstanding achievement for the MU-JHU Core Lab and for IDI. A laboratory of this caliber is an essential part of IDI's work to improve HIV/AIDS services throughout Uganda and the rest of sub-Saharan Africa. Accordia commends the MU-JHU Core Lab and the Infectious Diseases Institute and looks forward to continuing to support the exceptional work happening there every day."

Accordia Recognizes World Malaria Day 2010

April 23, 2010, Washington, DC: This Sunday, we recognize World Malaria Day, which commemorates the millions of people who battle the disease each year, celebrates the healthcare workers who provide treatment, and reinforces the drive to end the disease altogether.

Malaria takes the lives of over a million people each year, many of whom are children under the age of five. Ninety-percent of all cases occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The crisis has grown with the HIV/AIDS epidemic: malaria accelerates the course of AIDS and HIV increases the frequency and severity of malarial attacks.

Despite these grim statistics, there is hope for defeating malaria, which is both preventable and treatable. With improved access to prevention techniques like bed nets, effective medication, and training for healthcare workers to ensure proper diagnosis and treatment, the devastation caused by malaria can be dramatically decreased.

To help arm Africans in the fight against malaria, Accordia Global Health Foundation created an innovative training program, in partnership with ExxonMobil and the Infectious Diseases Institute in Kampala, Uganda. The training targets medical and laboratory staff and develops their skills in fever case management, including diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. By the end of the 2009, over 1100 healthcare workers had completed the cross-disciplinary, team-based malaria training. With appropriate skills and support, these dedicated healthcare workers are providing care and hope to thousands of people who are at risk of developing malaria or are already suffering from the disease.

Accordia Global Health Foundation is committed to expanding this successful training program and continuing to aid Africa in its fight against malaria.

2010 Infectious Diseases Summit Concludes in Dar es Salaam

April 16, 2010, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania: Friday marked the end of Accordia's Infectious Diseases Summit in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The event was a success, with attendees spending two days addressing challenges to long-term healthcare capacity-building in Africa. This is the final installment in the three-part series of reports from Accordia's 2010 Summit.

The final sessions of the Accordia Global Health Foundation's third annual Infectious Diseases Summit were sober but hopeful. Opinion was strong that effectively evaluating and measuring the impact of programs to improve healthcare worker capacity was critical to long-term efforts to achieve success, but everyone was quick to admit the somewhat daunting challenges that accompany that goal.

But there are examples out there, some that were presented at the Summit and others that were alluded to, that can provide guidance – many from other fields like agriculture and education – and there was total agreement that no matter how hard the task may be, it is one that must be accomplished. And it doesn't need to be done alone. In fact, there was strong consensus that if we in the healthcare capacity-building world are all contributing, we must also be collaborating and pushing in the same direction to be most effective.

Possibly the most common theme expressed throughout the Summit was the critical need in Africa for more and better bandwidth. Technology is getting better and fiber-optic cables are being put in place, but progress is painfully slow. As a result, so many of the things that we now take for granted in developed countries, like distance learning opportunities, easy access to new information, and long-distance mentoring, are incredibly difficult.

The ultimate goal of educating healthcare workers, whether in pre-service training or as part of an intensive effort of continuing education, is to improve the health of communities across Africa. We can do that by building positive-practice environments; scaling up training in ways that improve the medical schools, their graduates, and the community; and keeping the programs going as they are proven to be effective and adjusting ones that are less than effective to make them better.

Accordia Global Health Foundation, in partnership with the Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI) of Makerere University and the Fogarty International Center at the US National Institutes of Health, hosted Accordia's Third Annual Infectious Diseases Summit on April 15-16 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The Infectious Diseases Summit series is an invitation-only event designed to bring together key leaders and experts from the private sector, government, NGOs, foundations, and academia in a two-day, high-level strategic meeting to address issues related to long-term healthcare capacity building in Africa.

The theme of the 2010 Summit was Return on Investment: Building Healthcare Capacity in Africa and focused on generating new ways to frame how we define impact and translate the global call to action as it relates to long-term capacity building programs by sharing best practices and providing a dynamic forum for innovative thinking.

The 2010 Summit Program and the Performance Audit Handbook: Routes to effective evaluation are available for download. The majority of presentations are available upon request for summit participants.

At a release event in Washington D.C. in July 2010, Accordia released Return on Investment: The Long-Term Impact of Building Healthcare Capacity in Africa, which was informed by the 2010 Summit. .

Summit 2010 Steering Committee Membership

Alex Coutinho, MD, Executive Director, Infectious Diseases Institute
Ernest Darkoh, MD, MBA, MPH, Chairman and Founder, BroadReach Healthcare
Joe Feczko, MD, Accordia Board of Directors
Warner Greene, MD, PhD, President, Accordia Global Health Foundation; Director, Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology
Ken Gustavsen, MBA, Director, Corporate Social Responsibility, Merck & Co.
Laura Herman, Managing Director, FSG Global Impact
Michael Johnson, MD, Deputy Director, Fogarty International Center
Joe Kolars, MD, Senior Associate Dean, University of Michigan Medical School; Consultant, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Hank McKinnell, PhD, Chair, Accordia Global Health Foundation, 2010 Summit Co-Chair
Nelson Sewankambo, MD, Chairman, Infectious Diseases Institute, 2010 Summit Co-Chair
Jeff Sturchio, PhD, President and CEO, Global Health Council
Jack Watters, MD, VP External Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc

A Special Thank You to Our 2010 Summit Sponsors

Organizing Partner
Pfizer Inc

Leadership Partners
National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research
Merck

Sponsoring Partners
Bristol-Myers Squibb

Supporting Partners
Bayer Healthcare
BD 

Return on Investment: Building Healthcare Capacity in Africa

Accordia Global Health Foundation, in partnership with the Infectious Diseases Institute (IDI) of Makerere University and the Fogarty International Center at the US National Institutes of Health, hosted Accordia's Third Annual Infectious Diseases Summit on April 15-16 in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. The Infectious Diseases Summit series is an invitation-only event designed to bring together key leaders and experts from the private sector, government, NGOs, foundations, and academia in a two-day, high-level strategic meeting to address issues related to long-term healthcare capacity building in Africa.

The theme of the 2010 Summit was Return on Investment: Building Healthcare Capacity in Africa and focused on generating new ways to frame how we define impact and translate the global call to action as it relates to long-term capacity building programs by sharing best practices and providing a dynamic forum for innovative thinking.

The 2010 Summit Program and the Performance Audit Handbook: Routes to effective evaluation are available for download. The majority of presentations are available upon request for summit participants.

At a release event in Washington D.C. in July 2010, Accordia released Return on Investment: The Long-Term Impact of Building Healthcare Capacity in Africa, which was informed by the 2010 Summit. .

Summit 2010 Steering Committee Membership

Alex Coutinho, MD, Executive Director, Infectious Diseases Institute
Ernest Darkoh, MD, MBA, MPH, Chairman and Founder, BroadReach Healthcare
Joe Feczko, MD, Accordia Board of Directors
Warner Greene, MD, PhD, President, Accordia Global Health Foundation; Director, Gladstone Institute of Virology and Immunology
Ken Gustavsen, MBA, Director, Corporate Social Responsibility, Merck & Co.
Laura Herman, Managing Director, FSG Global Impact
Michael Johnson, MD, Deputy Director, Fogarty International Center
Joe Kolars, MD, Senior Associate Dean, University of Michigan Medical School; Consultant, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
Hank McKinnell, PhD, Chair, Accordia Global Health Foundation, 2010 Summit Co-Chair
Nelson Sewankambo, MD, Chairman, Infectious Diseases Institute, 2010 Summit Co-Chair
Jeff Sturchio, PhD, President and CEO, Global Health Council
Jack Watters, MD, VP External Medical Affairs, Pfizer Inc

A Special Thank You to Our 2010 Summit Sponsors

Organizing Partner
Pfizer Inc

Leadership Partners
National Institutes of Health, Office of AIDS Research
Merck

Sponsoring Partners
Bristol-Myers Squibb

Supporting Partners
Bayer Healthcare
BD

Accordia Commemorates World TB Day

March 24, 2010, Washington DC: Today, Accordia Global Health Foundation joins the global health community in recognizing World Tuberculosis Day.

Each year, nearly 2 million people die of TB-related causes, and the disease is the leading killer of people with HIV. Despite the prevalence of the disease, healthcare workers are limited by dated and often ineffective diagnostic and treatment options. The only licensed vaccine against TB is more than 100 years old and does not prevent adult pulmonary (lung) TB, the most common and infectious form of the disease.

Accordia's 2009 Global Health Leadership awardee and director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, Dr. Anthony Fauci, recently discussed the importance of investing in tuberculosis research, stating:

"There are primitive diagnostics, drug regimens that are complex, that are not new, that really don't work very well in many cases of multiple and extensively drug-resistant cases, and a vaccine that doesn't work. Is there a research challenge here? [We have a] disease that's centuries old, that kills 1.7 million people, and we have primitive counter measures against it.

"It is imperative that we use our current momentum to move forward, recognizing that the enormous challenges of global health…will require a long-term commitment that is sustained even when global health and those fighting to improve it are no longer in the headlines.

Accordia and its partners are focused on fulfilling this call to action and finding solutions that effectively prevent and treat tuberculosis. Accordia's Academic Alliance members are leading research projects and clinical trials in Uganda and around the world, in search of more advanced and effective disease prevention, diagnosis, and management methods.

Accordia's main implementing partner, the Infectious Diseases Institute in Kampala, Uganda, established a TB clinic in 2008 to improve diagnosis and treatment of patients co-infected with TB and HIV. Since its formation, the clinic has screened thousands of patients for tuberculosis and treated hundreds more. Tuberculosis management has become a cornerstone of IDI's work to improve HIV/AIDS services in Kampala and throughout the rest of Uganda.

As millions of people around the world continue to suffer from tuberculosis, Accordia unites with the global health community, working toward innovative solutions through tuberculosis treatment, research, and training. 

EXTERNAL CONTROL TEMPLATE

This template controls the elements:

TOP: Top Links (Home, Donate, Events, Contact), Social Network Buttons, Tagline, Tagline Image

FOOTER: Footer Links (Privacy Policy, Contact, Donate), Footer Descriptions

* This message is only visible in administrative mode